In the Year 2020, we have this Crisis in Cork, Michael Martin’s City. Do the Government really Care; The Answer is No. Why is there over 90,000 plus houses Vacant in this Cold Country?

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Cork homeless crisis: Simon Community
          supports almost 1,100 people 
More than 450 people stayed in Cork’s Simon emergency shelter and night light services during 2019, an average of 61 people per night. Of this, 50% were first-time presentations.

Fri, 11 Dec, 2020 – 00:00

Cork Simon Community supported almost 1,100 men and women last year, as more people than ever before turned to the community’s homeless emergency services for shelter, care, and support.

More than 450 people stayed in Cork’s Simon emergency shelter and night light services during 2019, an average of 61 people per night. Of this, 50% were first-time presentations.

More than 670 men and women also used Cork Simon’s Soup Run throughout 2019, with almost 11,500 hot meals served.

The figures are included in the community’s 2019 annual report, published this Friday.

Last year, 68 people in Cork Simon’s emergency accommodation were ‘long-term homeless’, defined by the Government as staying 183 days or more in emergency accommodation over the previous 12 months.

By the end of the year, 25% of these people were housed.

Last year, Cork Simon also made a positive impact on hundreds of people’s journey out of homelessness.

Almost 300 people were supported back into education, training and employment, and almost 70 people supported into addiction treatment and aftercare services.

In 2019, the community helped 52 people, effectively one person a week, into secure and affordable independent and supported housing, an increase of 21% more than in 2018.

Read More

Housing charity intervened in over 100 illegal evictions this year, despite ban 

JJ, one of the 52 people Cork Simon helped house in 2019, was homeless for almost 20 years.

“I’ve definitely changed”, he said. “But I’m happy … after all them years I went through.” 

I’ve got everything my own way – everything’s here. And when I want to go to sleep, lock my door, make sure it’s locked; nothing, nobody bothering me.”  Last year, 68 people in Cork Simon’s emergency accommodation
      were ‘long-term homeless’, defined by the Government as staying
      183 days or more in emergency accommodation over the previous 12
      months.Picture: iStock

‘Rose’, another person Cork Simon helped house, described the impact that secure, affordable housing has had on her life as, “having independence”.

She said: “I can have my own shower, when I want; I can have my own peace and quiet; I can have my own sanity.”

“That’s a great security in someone’s life. I know everybody can’t get it at the moment, but everybody should have it.”Learn more

Dermot Kavanagh, Cork Simon director, said: “Home is where people are safest and home is where people thrive.” 

Our experience of the pandemic this year has emphasised our need as a society to move to a situation where we provide care to people in their own homes wherever possible rather than in emergency shelters or institutional homes.” 

“That requires the Government to take all measures necessary to ensure a sufficient supply of affordable homes.” 

“As our renovation of SS Joachim and Anne’s demonstrates, we will work constructively and engage progressively with the Government to end homelessness.”

Number of people Simon Communities helped last year went up 8%

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Last year, 68 people in Cork Simon’s emergency accommodation were ‘long-term homeless’, defined by the Government as staying 183 days or more in emergency accommodation over the previous 12 months.

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