Pervert Shine a Millionaire, yet the State pays out Millions, while He keeps his Large Pension, and Properties, here and Spain? Fucking Disgusting?

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The National Gallery still credits paedophile Shine for €150k painting

 Paul Caffrey

 

05/03/2022

The National Gallery owns a €150,000 painting donated by disgraced Michael Shine – and still credits him for his gift.

The sex predator, a retired surgeon, donated An Ejected Family by the Scottish artist Erskine Nicol to the State back in 1992.

The Famine painting was displayed in the National Gallery of Ireland until 2011 when it was removed from view.

Disgraced Michael Shine donated An Ejected Family by the Scottish artist Erskine Nicol to the State back in 1992. Pic: Collins Courts

But the expensive 1853 artwork has been kept in the gallery’s collection ever since – with a view to putting it back on display in the future.

Last week, Shine, 86, was jailed for four years for preying on seven boys over a 21-year period spanning the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. Judge Martin Nolan said the ex-surgeon ‘must suffer’ this punishment even though he might die behind bars.

But the paedophile’s art donation is still listed on the National Gallery’s website as part of its overall collection – with Shine fully credited for his involvement.

An Ejected Family by Erskine Nicol. Pic: Gallery of the Masters

A description of the important work on the gallery’s site notes that it was ‘presented, Mr Michael Shine, 1992’.

The piece was not on public display when Extra.ie paid a visit to the National Gallery in Dublin in recent days.

Along with other works, it was placed in temporary storage by the NGI in 2011 – two years after Shine, of upmarket Wellington Road in Dublin 4, was struck off the medical register.

The National Gallery still credits Shine for his gift. Pic: Collins Courts

It was removed to allow for a multi-million-euro overhaul of two wings of the gallery that was completed in 2017. The painting has not yet been re-displayed.

But insiders said the gallery’s displayed works are routinely ‘rotated’, so there is no reason why the ‘popular’ painting won’t get another outing.

One well-placed source said: ‘It’s currently in storage. That’s because we have more paintings than we have wall space, and they go in a cycle. It’s a popular one and I’m sure it will be up again in not too long a time.’ In an official statement, the National Gallery did not rule out exhibiting the important work for art lovers once again.

The Famine painting was displayed in the National Gallery of Ireland until 2011 when it was removed from view. Pic: Shutterstock

The NGI said: ‘An Ejected Family by Erskine Nicol was removed from display in 2011, when the collection was decanted [temporarily taken down] to facilitate the refurbishment of the Dargan and Milltown Wings… The display of the collection is under constant review.’ As something of an art enthusiast who once moved in elite social circles, Shine is thought to have built up a substantial art collection over the years including the poignant Famine-era work An Ejected Family. Featuring a family of seven being kicked out of their home for failing to pay their rent, the painting is one of Nicol’s best-known works.

It’s not clear exactly how the sex offender originally acquired the artwork, but Extra.ie has learned it sold for Stg£13,000 to a mystery buyer at a Sotheby’s auction in London on November 20, 1978. That equates to just over €85,000 in today’s money.

Last night Sotheby’s declined to confirm the identity of the purchaser. The painting was donated to our National Gallery by Shine 14 years later.

One of Shine’s victims, 56-yearold former garda Patrick Cusack, from Co. Monaghan, said he was ‘handed a life sentence of pain’ by the retired surgeon but that the predator ‘is not going to haunt me anymore.’ At least 110 of Shine’s alleged victims are currently suing him for compensation. Their cases are expected to be heard in the High Court later this year.

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